Even the mainstream middle class sources of literature, such as news magazines and newspapers, began to reflect these recent changes in sexual expression. These developments were, of course, accompany by similar changes in other media. Magazine photos have progressed from the bare-breasted Playboy bunny of the fifties to complete frontal nudity in Hustler, Cosmopolitan, etc.
The end of the war ushered in a similar revolution in cinema sex. When Howard Hughes in 1945 featured a daring exposure of Jane Russell's cleavage in The Outlaw, over the strenuous objections of the movie censorship office (thereby insuring the movie's box office success), he risked fine and imprisonment as a purveyor of pornography. Only twenty years later, the movie censorship system which had dictated the morality of the movie-going public for the previous several decades, was abandoned in favor of a rating system, in order to accommodate what seemed like an increasing demand for greater sexual explicitness and self-determined morality.
Finally there were similar important changes in pop music themes and expression. A Cole Porter tune of the thirties, for example, might be risque or even suggestive but never sexually explicit. All of this changed, however, when Elvis Presley gyrated his pelvis on national television, and the Beatles, Rolling Stones, and other rock artists acknowledged explicit sexual themes in the lyrics of their songs.
These are, of course, the most highly visible examples of the sexual revolution. They are now familiar to all of us and so commonplace that they do not require any further elaboration.
Men's Health-Erectile Dysfunction

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